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Mourning and mysticism in First World War literature and beyond : grappling with ghosts

by Johnson, George M [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015Description: xiv, 256 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781349673476 (paperback).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Great Britain -- Literature and the war | English literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Mourning customs in literature | Mysticism in literature | Spiritualism in literature | HISTORY / Military / World War I | LITERARY CRITICISM / General | LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh | PHILOSOPHY / ReligiousDDC classification: 820.9358 J630M
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: -- PrefaceIntroduction: Attachment, Mourning and Mysticism1. F. W. H. Myers: Loss and the Obsessive Study of Survival2. Spirit Soldiers: Oliver Lodge's Raymond and Christopher3. From Parodist to Proselytizer: Arthur Conan Doyle's 'Vital Message'4. Well-Remembered Voices: Mourning and Spirit Communication in Barrie and Kipling's First World War Narratives5. 'Mourning, the War, and the 'New Mysticism' in May Sinclair and Virginia Woolf'6. 'Purgatorial Passions': 'The ghost' (a.k.a. Wilfred Owen) in Owen's poetry7. ''Misty-schism': the Psychological Roots of Aldous Huxley's Mystical Modernism'8. After-life/After-word: the Culture of Mourning and MysticismBibliographyIndex.
Summary: "How did people respond to the overwhelming loss of loved ones during the First World War? Many took their lead from iconic early twentieth-century writers, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Oliver Lodge, J.M. Barrie, Rudyard Kipling, Virginia Woolf, Wilfred Owen, and Aldous Huxley, among others, who embraced some form of mysticism as a means of coping. These figures had experienced profound losses and even trauma in their early lives, sensitizing them to losses of loved ones during the war and making these writers receptive to the possibility of communicating with spirits. Most of these writers had become fascinated with the work of Frederic Myers and other key psychical researchers regarding potential extensions of personality, including telepathy, clairvoyance, and automatic writing, phenomena which supported the possibility that personality survived death. Mourning and Mysticism in First World War Literature and Beyond skilfully weaves psychology, history, psychobiography and literary analysis to show that these writers' engagement with mysticism and spiritualism in particular was not deluded, but at least in some situations constituted a more ethical, creative and therapeutic form of mourning than drawing solace from state-sanctioned representations of mourning such as war memorials"--
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Books Books Central Library, IISER Bhopal

 

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Reference Section
Reference 820.9358 J630M (Browse shelf) Not For Loan Reserve 10803

Includes bibliographical references (pages 234-251) and index.

Machine generated contents note: -- PrefaceIntroduction: Attachment, Mourning and Mysticism1. F. W. H. Myers: Loss and the Obsessive Study of Survival2. Spirit Soldiers: Oliver Lodge's Raymond and Christopher3. From Parodist to Proselytizer: Arthur Conan Doyle's 'Vital Message'4. Well-Remembered Voices: Mourning and Spirit Communication in Barrie and Kipling's First World War Narratives5. 'Mourning, the War, and the 'New Mysticism' in May Sinclair and Virginia Woolf'6. 'Purgatorial Passions': 'The ghost' (a.k.a. Wilfred Owen) in Owen's poetry7. ''Misty-schism': the Psychological Roots of Aldous Huxley's Mystical Modernism'8. After-life/After-word: the Culture of Mourning and MysticismBibliographyIndex.

"How did people respond to the overwhelming loss of loved ones during the First World War? Many took their lead from iconic early twentieth-century writers, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Oliver Lodge, J.M. Barrie, Rudyard Kipling, Virginia Woolf, Wilfred Owen, and Aldous Huxley, among others, who embraced some form of mysticism as a means of coping. These figures had experienced profound losses and even trauma in their early lives, sensitizing them to losses of loved ones during the war and making these writers receptive to the possibility of communicating with spirits. Most of these writers had become fascinated with the work of Frederic Myers and other key psychical researchers regarding potential extensions of personality, including telepathy, clairvoyance, and automatic writing, phenomena which supported the possibility that personality survived death. Mourning and Mysticism in First World War Literature and Beyond skilfully weaves psychology, history, psychobiography and literary analysis to show that these writers' engagement with mysticism and spiritualism in particular was not deluded, but at least in some situations constituted a more ethical, creative and therapeutic form of mourning than drawing solace from state-sanctioned representations of mourning such as war memorials"--

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