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City of noise : sound and nineteenth-century Paris

by Boutin, Aimee [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Studies in sensory history.Publisher: Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015Description: viii, 194 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780252080784 (paperback : alkaline paper).Subject(s): City noise -- France -- Paris -- History -- 19th century | Noise pollution -- France -- Paris | Street vendors -- France -- Paris -- History -- 19th century | Urban renewal -- France -- Paris -- History -- 19th century | Urban policy -- France -- Paris -- History -- 19th century | City and town life -- France -- Paris -- History -- 19th century | Paris (France) -- History -- 19th century | Paris (France) -- Social life and customs -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 944.36106 B669C
Contents:
Introduction -- Aural flânerie : the flâneur in the city as concert -- Blason sonore : street cries in the city -- Sonic classifications in Haussmann's Paris -- Listening to the glazier's cry -- "Cry louder, street crier" : peddling poetry and the avant-garde -- Conclusion.
Summary: "Nineteenth-century Paris was grand, busy, and overwhelmingly noisy, so noisy that the racket became a matter for public concern in Paris before any other city. There were not only more people in the growing metropolis, but more sources of sound, much of it sung, barked, or bellowed to sell merchandise. The competition for attention raised the volume and increased the variety of sounds as street peddlers strove to be heard amid the din. Aimée Boutin draws on the first-hand accounts of Parisian noise to recreate, as much as possible, what the city sounded like, especially in its commercial core, and how people responded to the different sounds. Boutin focuses on the peddlers whose status altered in the 19th century. Dating back to the Middle Ages, the Cris de Paris were a musical, textual, and graphic genre that classified tradesmen as fixed, often idealized types, identified by the cries of their trade. In the 19th century, Parisian peddlers were perceived by bourgeois listeners as troublemakers (noisiers), lowlife who disturbed the peace, and by poets like Baudelaire as challenges to the bourgeois he despised. Itinerant, often from provinces that spoke a different accent, they were just a step above begging, or peddled as a pretense for begging, and they demanded to be heard. Peddlers became identified with sedition and rebellion. Boutin examines how peddlers were affected by Baron Haussmann's rebuilding of Paris, and by legislation and urban policy regarding vagrancy and noise abatement. As the peddlers' cries diminished, they were taken into poetry, but they never really went away"--
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Books Books Central Library, IISER Bhopal

 

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Reference Section
Reference 944.36106 B669C (Browse shelf) Checked out to Nakshatra Chatterjee (2110802) Not For Loan Book recommended by Dr. Anuparna Mukherjee 10/01/2022 10766
Browsing Central Library, IISER Bhopal Shelves , Shelving location: Reference Section , Collection code: Reference Close shelf browser
938 H191O OCR classical civilisation 940.531814 H615G Generation of postmemory : 943.085 B620H Heritage of our times 944.36106 B669C City of noise : 954 D15P Puffin history of India: 954 Sa59I India in the age of ideas : 954.035092 G151A An autobiography:

Includes bibliographical references (pages 167-182) and index.

Introduction -- Aural flânerie : the flâneur in the city as concert -- Blason sonore : street cries in the city -- Sonic classifications in Haussmann's Paris -- Listening to the glazier's cry -- "Cry louder, street crier" : peddling poetry and the avant-garde -- Conclusion.

"Nineteenth-century Paris was grand, busy, and overwhelmingly noisy, so noisy that the racket became a matter for public concern in Paris before any other city. There were not only more people in the growing metropolis, but more sources of sound, much of it sung, barked, or bellowed to sell merchandise. The competition for attention raised the volume and increased the variety of sounds as street peddlers strove to be heard amid the din. Aimée Boutin draws on the first-hand accounts of Parisian noise to recreate, as much as possible, what the city sounded like, especially in its commercial core, and how people responded to the different sounds. Boutin focuses on the peddlers whose status altered in the 19th century. Dating back to the Middle Ages, the Cris de Paris were a musical, textual, and graphic genre that classified tradesmen as fixed, often idealized types, identified by the cries of their trade. In the 19th century, Parisian peddlers were perceived by bourgeois listeners as troublemakers (noisiers), lowlife who disturbed the peace, and by poets like Baudelaire as challenges to the bourgeois he despised. Itinerant, often from provinces that spoke a different accent, they were just a step above begging, or peddled as a pretense for begging, and they demanded to be heard. Peddlers became identified with sedition and rebellion. Boutin examines how peddlers were affected by Baron Haussmann's rebuilding of Paris, and by legislation and urban policy regarding vagrancy and noise abatement. As the peddlers' cries diminished, they were taken into poetry, but they never really went away"--

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